A Fond Farewell To Lauded Diplomat, Daniel Taub

It is not every day that someone gets to meet the Queen of England but this is just what Daniel Taub did on fine day in 2011 as part of a ambassadorial trip. For Daniel Taub, who was himself born in the 60s in England but immigrated to Israel due to his Orthodox Judaism, this was something of a homecoming. Learn more about Daniel Taub: http://www.daniel-taub.co.il/

As of his 2011 meeting with the Queen of England, Mr. Taub was operating as the premier Israeli diplomat and was overjoyed to be returning to the country he had grownup in. The Queen had a interesting question to ask: Who did it feel to be a representative to the very country he had been born in?

Daniel Taub responded that he couldn’t be happier to be doing it as it allowed him the opportunity to build up bridges between the two world powers that had not even existed and patch up those which had since fallen into disrepair.

Such was the ethos of the Israeli diplomat who would, only four years later, retire wholly from political life. Mr. Taub was so effective in his role as ambassador that during his retirement party a whole host of England’s Jewish community flocked to see him and give him a proper send off and lament his exit from world politics.

All of them were intensely saddened to see him go. A bevvy of opinion polls have since shown that Taub was one of the single most popular Israeli political envoys to Britain of all time, rivaling even former famed diplomat, Schlomo Argov. Read more: Daniel Taub | About and  Daniel Taub | LinkedIn

Somewhat later, when Mr. Taub spoke publicly about his exit from politics he was asked what he thought contributed most to his immense popularity and political success. He responded that building bridges instead of burning them down was, of course, central to any political success but also noted another more central factor, putting aside one’s own personal bias in favor of the greater good.

Mr. Taub stated that many of the politicians he spoke to continuously asked him how he managed to remain so neutral and open minded, how he was able to separate his personal opinions from the needs of the nations he was representing and negotiating with.

He responded flatly that what was good for Israel was good for him and for many other countries in the world.

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